Just Married

Just Married

U/A
Comedy, Romance
Open: March 01, 2007
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2 / 42 / 42 / 42 / 4MovieTalkies.com - Just Married is Meghna Gulzar's second directorial venture after Filhaal and the director definitely seems to be at much more ease in this movie. That ease is evident in the manner in which the exposition takes place. Just married is a lot more smooth with keThere is certain smoothness about this movie which was not so evident in her debut film. Having said that, the first of the film is quite flawlessly constructed but it's towards the middle and the end that the film falls apart. The film's subject is interesting, even though it bears an uncanny similarity to Honeymoon Travels Pvt Ltd. Their treatments are definitely different. The tagline of Just Married says, Marriage was only the beginning. The film's premise is the concept of arranged marriage. Two strangers, Abhay (Fardeen Khan) and Ritika, city-bred, well-educated, are yoked into an arranged marriage by their parents. The girl does find it a little odd and does demur a little but finally gives in to her parents. So, two strangers married to each other and packed off on a five-day honeymoon to Ooty with four other couples. The other couples are played by Satish Shah and Kirron Kher; Sadiya Siddique and Mukul Dev; Parizaad Zorabian and Bikram Saluja and Raj Zutshi and Tarina Patel. The motley group is as different from each other as chalk from cheese and has their own take on marriage, love and relationships. The conflict of the film is based on the fact that the man, Abhay wants to consummate marriage while Ritika does not. But her reasons are not very clearly laid out and as the movie progresses, seem very flimsy and baseless. But to start a little earlier, the director does a very good job of building up the entire pressure that newly-weds have to go through on a honeymoon, beginning from coy knowing looks by relatives and friends to the 'special' reception accorded by hotels – honeymoon suites, heart-shaped pillows strewn across the double bed etc. Meghna builds that pressure up very well. It is a pressure for two strangers who are married to each other. Stuck with other much married couples, Abhay and Ritika have never held hands or snuggled up to each other and they are just about getting to know each other. The director manages to bring out the nervousness of her characters very well, especially Ritika's anxiety and sense of claustrophobia, as also the awkwardness between Abhay and Ritika when they find themselves alone for the first time. The initial portrait of Fardeen's character is of a very understanding, suave gentleman. So his subsequent behaviour at Ritika rejecting his overtures seems more like a man sulking. It does not quite go with his character. And the rest of film proceeds with Fardeen's character acting like a man rejected in love. The disconnect happens as the first half of the film does not justify the second half. The director seems to suggest strongly through the narrative in the second half that Abhay is right in feeling rejected and it goes ahead to justify what a good man he is. The rest of the film proceeds with Ritika feeling left out and slightly humiliated and Abhay acting like a boor because she dared to say 'no'. Even though Ritika's grounds for rejection are slightly over the top, the rest of the action does not justify the basic premise of strangers just married. The screenplay lets down the film and the actors. What could have made for a very interesting and novel film turns out to be quite pedestrian. The other couples don't really add much to the action of the movie except for the Kirron Kher-Satish Shah jodi, who for all their bickering show what being together and a couple is all about. The end is quite contrived unlike the beginning of the film, which is so authentic and real. The lead actors, neither of who are known for their acting prowess, actually turn in decent performances. Fardeen is surprisingly good as the understanding husband. Esha Deol too puts in quite a nuanced performance. Satish Shah and Kirron Kher are veterans at their trade and put in a competent performance. Just Married begins well, but fails to keep the spark alive. The promise of a good film gets lost somewhere halfway and after that it just plods along to the end.

Just Married is Meghna Gulzar's second directorial venture after Filhaal and the director definitely seems to be at much more ease in this movie. That ease is evident in the manner in which the exposition takes place. Just married is a lot more smooth with keThere is certain smoothness about this movie which was not so evident in her debut film. Having said that, the first of the film is quite flawlessly constructed but it's towards the middle and the end that the film falls apart. The film's subject is interesting, even though it bears an uncanny similarity to Honeymoon Travels Pvt Ltd. Their treatments are definitely different. The tagline of Just Married says, Marriage was only the beginning. The film's premise is the concept of arranged marriage. Two strangers, Abhay (Fardeen Khan) and Ritika, city-bred, well-educated, are yoked into an arranged marriage by their parents. The girl does find it a little odd and does demur a little but finally gives in to her parents. So, two strangers married to each other and packed off on a five-day honeymoon to Ooty with four other couples. The other couples are played by Satish Shah and Kirron Kher; Sadiya Siddique and Mukul Dev; Parizaad Zorabian and Bikram Saluja and Raj Zutshi and Tarina Patel. The motley group is as different from each other as chalk from cheese and has their own take on marriage, love and relationships. The conflict of the film is based on the fact that the man, Abhay wants to consummate marriage while Ritika does not. But her reasons are not very clearly laid out and as the movie progresses, seem very flimsy and baseless. But to start a little earlier, the director does a very good job of building up the entire pressure that newly-weds have to go through on a honeymoon, beginning from coy knowing looks by relatives and friends to the 'special' reception accorded by hotels – honeymoon suites, heart-shaped pillows strewn across the double bed etc. Meghna builds that pressure up very well. It is a pressure for two strangers who are married to each other. Stuck with other much married couples, Abhay and Ritika have never held hands or snuggled up to each other and they are just about getting to know each other. The director manages to bring out the nervousness of her characters very well, especially Ritika's anxiety and sense of claustrophobia, as also the awkwardness between Abhay and Ritika when they find themselves alone for the first time. The initial portrait of Fardeen's character is of a very understanding, suave gentleman. So his subsequent behaviour at Ritika rejecting his overtures seems more like a man sulking. It does not quite go with his character. And the rest of film proceeds with Fardeen's character acting like a man rejected in love. The disconnect happens as the first half of the film does not justify the second half. The director seems to suggest strongly through the narrative in the second half that Abhay is right in feeling rejected and it goes ahead to justify what a good man he is. The rest of the film proceeds with Ritika feeling left out and slightly humiliated and Abhay acting like a boor because she dared to say 'no'. Even though Ritika's grounds for rejection are slightly over the top, the rest of the action does not justify the basic premise of strangers just married. The screenplay lets down the film and the actors. What could have made for a very interesting and novel film turns out to be quite pedestrian. The other couples don't really add much to the action of the movie except for the Kirron Kher-Satish Shah jodi, who for all their bickering show what being together and a couple is all about. The end is quite contrived unlike the beginning of the film, which is so authentic and real. The lead actors, neither of who are known for their acting prowess, actually turn in decent performances. Fardeen is surprisingly good as the understanding husband. Esha Deol too puts in quite a nuanced performance. Satish Shah and Kirron Kher are veterans at their trade and put in a competent performance. Just Married begins well, but fails to keep the spark alive. The promise of a good film gets lost somewhere halfway and after that it just plods along to the end.

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